It’s Hard to Sell Invisible Books

I’m a quiet person who likes to tinker around the house in the morning, write for several hours and drop a line now and again to see if I get a bite. I’m not one for galas, dinners or standing on a grandstand boasting about my book. But I’ve learned over the past ten months that if I’m going to stick around a while in this writing business I have to tell people I’m here and what I have to offer.

Jay Underwood, former editor and current owner of Pennydreadful Publishing, offered a few local authors space on a table at a local bank to display their books alongside his. Although my quiet side said, “Pass” my author side said, “Okay.”

Diane Lynn Tibert
Books by Local Authors on Display

 

So from May 9th until May 21st, visitors to the Royal Bank in Elmsdale, NS can view a selection of books written by me and three other local authors who are exploring the self-publishing industry. Anyone wishing to buy a book can do so from a bank employee.

The Authors and their Books

Jay Underwood: Jay is a long-time Elmsdale resident and an expert on the Canadian railway history. He created Pennydreadful Publishing to publish his books and is interested in helping others get published, too. He’s had a few books published by tradition publishers, but also sees the advantages to self-publishing.

Jay Underwood
From Folly to Fortune by Jay Underwood

Jay has three books on display:

Kings of the Iron Road: Stories of the men who made Nova Scotia’s railways work

From Folly to Fortune: The Firing of James Richardson Forman

Confederation Conspiracy: The curious career of a civil engineer.

Art Burton: Art lives in Lattie’s Brook and has been dabbling in self-publishing for a few years. He started out by having a local company print and staple his books which he sold at different venues. More recently, he’s given Blurb a try and re-released his collection of short stories. You can read more about Art, his books and his publishing experience by visiting his blog: http://lattiesbrookwriter.wordpress.com

Art has two books on display:

For Hire, Messenger of GOD: A Murder Mystery

Hobos I Have Known

Art Burton
Hobos I Have Known by Art Burton

Sam Lynn Smith: Sam’s first book came about because of a school assignment designed to education students on bullying. Her enthusiasm and creativity took over, producing a piece of work that deserved to be published.

Sam has one book on display:

Boys Ride, Too

Diane Lynn Tibert: Diane lives in Milford Station. She’s a genealogy columnist and the alter ego of Candy McMudd, author of the youth novel Mystery Light in Cranberry Cove. She created Quarter Castle Publishing to publish her own books and perhaps someday help others get their work in print. To learn more, visit Tibert’s website: http://www.thefamilyattic.info/Tibert.html

Diane has one book on display:

Mystery Light in Cranberry Cove

Sam Lynn Smith
Boys Ride, Too by Sam Lynn Smith

 

There, my book is not invisible anymore. It’s there for all the public to see. Even if I don’t sell a book, I’ve learned that I can do this. Armed with this knowledge, I may just do more . . . a lot more.

8 thoughts on “It’s Hard to Sell Invisible Books

  1. Congratulations on getting your book on display! I think it’s an excellent opportunity. Although writers may not like advertising, the only way to get readers seems to be telling someone that you write. 🙂

  2. As much as we’d like to stay invisible the reality of it is if we want our books to be read we can’t remain invisible. To help myself with this I’ve made a commitment to take whatever opportunities come my way whenever possible. I don’t want to spend my life looking at missed opportunities because I was too shy about jumping in. I did that for too many years.

    It wouldn’t have hurt for you to add a pic in this post of your book cover as well.

    Nice to see a place where local authors can display their work. You know I do like local! 🙂

    • Thanks, Laura. I think I’ve let a few opportunities slip by because I was too shy to open the door. I’m getting better, but I have a long way to go.

      My desire to keep writing will encourage me to take advantage of more opportunies.

      Oh, I thought because I had pictures of my book to the right on this page, that adding one to the post wouldn’t be necessary.

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