Catherine MacKenzie interviews Diane Lynn McGyver at the Writing Wicket

Today I’m at the Writing Wicket as Diane Lynn McGyver, my alternate ego who writes fantasy novels. Catherine MacKenzie interviews writers every Wednesday on her blog, so if you’re interested, drop her a line.

You can check out my interview here: Writer Wednesdays – Diane Lynn McGyver.

Also, since it’s my birthday, I made all my Castle Keepers Tale short stories free for the day. These short stories tie in with my fantasy novels, Shadows in the Stone and Scattered Stones.

Catriona Wheatcroft

stars in Destiny Governed their Lives

Destiny Governed their Lives short story fantasy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bronwyn Darrow

stars in Blade of Truth

Blade of Truth fantasy short story

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alaura of Niamh (pronounced ‘Neev’)

stars in The Pledge

The Pledge short story fantasy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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No One is Surprised: CreateSpace Closes and KDP Print Takes Over

Amazon CreateSpace KDP PrintBetween putting the laundry in the washer and hanging it on the line and while I was making pancakes for my youngest child, washing dishes and waiting for the buzzer on the oven to go to indicate the cinnamon rolls were ready for extraction, an email popped up in my inbox.

The subject told me all I wanted to know, and if Amazon thought they’d surprise me, they couldn’t have been more mistaken: CreateSpace and Kindle Direct Publishing to become one service

I didn’t bother opening the message; I was too busy, and I knew what it was all about.

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What is Google AMP, and how can I deactivate it?

A few weeks ago, I noticed something strange when I checked the stats for my blog. In the Referrer Section was a referral from me, or at least it appeared to be from me until I revealed the complete address. It began as dianetibert.com.cdn.ampproject.org followed by about 50 more letters and numbers.

The Referrer Section reveals the paths visitors take to get to my website. The majority are usually through search engines, WordPress.com reader, Facebook and Twitter, but I often get visitors from other sites too.

The names are familiar and if a new one pops up, I check it out. Knowing where traffic comes from helps in many ways, including informing me of new websites that may have information that will help me in my publishing / writing journey.

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Amazon’s New KDP Print Feature is Bad News for CreateSpace Users

The first news I heard about KDP Print was in an email from Amazon on February 15th. Since then, I’ve read articles, blog posts and comments about it and watched the praise given by Amazon for this service dwindle quickly.

In the email, Amazon announced they were making print book publishing easier for writers. They stated, “KDP prints your book on demand and subtracts your printing costs from your royalties, so you don’t have to pay any costs upfront or carry any inventory.”

That’s what CreateSpace does. Sort of. I believe CreateSpace takes the cost of the printing of the book from the sale price, then takes a cut of the royalties. Until I see the numbers and do the math, I am unsure which service will offer a better financial deal for authors.

The message also stated, “It also enables you to receive consolidated royalty payments for paperback and eBook sales. You can view combined reports and manage your print and eBook publishing from one website.”

Except, I’m okay with visiting two sites to get my sales reports. In fact, I prefer CreateSpace’s sales report much more than I do Kindle’s. Kindle’s is not straightforward and too clunky to find answers quickly.

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Halifax Chronicle Herald Buys Transcontinental Newspapers

This afternoon, I was informed Halifax Chronicle Herald purchased 28 publications (including one online) owned by Transcontinental. The CBC online article stated it bought all of their news outlets in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador.

As a genealogy columnist for The Citizen Record, Amherst, NS, I’m unsure of what the future holds for me and other freelance columnists.

During many changes years ago, Transcontinental presented columnists with a new contract that, if signed, would make their original contract with the publication null and void. I ignored the new contract, and they didn’t pester me to sign it. To this day, I work under the original contracts I signed when I began Roots to the Past in 2005. The purchase by Halifax Chronicle Herald may force me to do the unthinkable: end the column. That is, if they try to force me to sign a bad contract.

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Stalked by Cats, Dogs and Food

guinea-fowlIs it just me, or are many other bloggers these days being followed by blogs that only post pictures of either cute cats, adorable dogs or tasty food dishes?

A few times a week, I get a notice about a new follower. I always visit the new follower’s page to see what information they are sharing with the world. Because my site is about writing, publishing and similar topics, sites that follow me almost always discuss the same subjects.

Except lately. For the past three or four months, I’ve been followed by individuals who only post pictures. The blogs have cute names such as “Cute Cat Pictures” or something similar. When I visit the site, I find posts that consist of only pictures and no words. This isn’t new because I’ve seen blog posts made up of images before. But what is new is the format and picture content: one picture per post consisting of an animal or food.

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Books with Table of Contents in the back of eBooks targeted by Amazon

New FlashAmazon is an extremely innovative company – and usually quite responsive to self-publisher’s concerns – but sometimes it gets things very wrong too.

Today is one of those times.

I’ve received several reports from writers threatened with having books removed from sale, and heard even more worrying stories from others who had their titles actually removed from the Kindle Store without notice.

What were these authors guilty of? What crime did they commit for Amazon to adopt such heavy handed treatment? Something completely innocuous: the Table of Contents was at the rear of their books instead of at the front.

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