Important Information if You Plan to Publish a Colouring eBook

Lessons in Self-publishingThis year—I’ve been told—is the year of the adult colouring book. I’ve seen them around in local stores. My first reaction was to giggle. Colouring books for adults? Seriously?

Then I flipped through them and thought, “They’re complicated. I’ll stick to my kids’ old colouring books.”

You see, I don’t think it’s horrible for adults to colour. I’ve been colouring all my life. With crayons. Coloured pencils. Markers. And whatever I could get my hands on. I think colouring is a great relaxing exercise, and it’s a great physical exercise for your hand. It also sparks imagination, and trust me, I’ve got lots of imagination to prove it works.

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Adding Twitter to Your Blog Posts

Throught of the DayIn the past few months, I’ve visited a lot of blogs, more so than usual. I’m trying to be more social because for a while there, I wasn’t getting out much.

When I read a good post, I like to inform the writer that I liked it. LIKE buttons allow me to do this with little effort.

Sometimes I like to comment on the post, so I do. But I’ll tell you, some blogs make me jump through hoops to get that comment added. A few make me do it twice. There’s one blog I never comment on anymore because I have no idea how to get it right the first time. It is frustrating to write a comment only to have it disappear without a trace while I am answering math questions or figuring out those wavy letters to let the host know I am not a robot.

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Amazon Reviews

EllsworthWe all know how important reviews are for authors and books. They can help sell a book, and they can help deter others from buying a book. Some authors call reviews the life-blood of sales. However, I’ve visited a few book-sellers’ pages and looked at popular books and found no reviews—not one. I know they sold well, so why wouldn’t they have reviews?

Reviews sell books to a certain audience, but not to the readers who don’t go online and seek reviews.

Readers look to reviews for an honest assessment of the story to help them to decide if they want to read the book or not. When there are dozens, perhaps hundreds of reviews for a book, there’s usually a wide range of ratings. I’ve seen popular books with many four and five star reviews, but they also have one-star reviews. That’s because one book doesn’t please everyone.

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Self-Publishing Vaguely Defined

Self vs IndieI read an article recently that seemed dated. In other words, my first impression was that it was written eight, maybe ten years ago. However, on further reading, I found it was published on December 7, 2015.

My first impression came from two things:

1) The lack of specifics pertaining to self-publishing.

2) The snobbery aimed at those who self-publish.

In the early days of self-publishing, authors used a collection of names to call themselves: self-published authors, freelancers, independent authors, independent publishers, non-traditional authors and indies (shorted from the independent adjective). Some simply called themselves authors and left it at that.

All these tags are still used, but many authors have settled on one and used it to brand their work. Authors can use whichever they want to describe the method they use to get their stories into the hands of readers. They all mean the same thing.

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Distribution News from Smashwords

New FlashSmashwords Expands Global Ebook Distribution with Odilo, Tolino and Yuzu

Smashwords today announced three new partners that further expand the reach of the Smashwords ebook distribution network in the US, Europe and South America.
The new agreements with Odilo, Tolino and Yuzu span three continents and will allow over 300,000 Smashwords titles to reach new readers at retail, in higher education and at public libraries.
Here are details for each the three agreements:

Odilo brings Smashwords expanded library distribution in North America, South America and Europe

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Don’t Get Burned with Copyright Misuse

New FlashDo you know where all the photos come from that you use to spice up your blogs?

Some of you may have noticed my sparse visits around blogtown and social media these past few days. That was because I’ve been a busy beaver, trying to protect myself from FURTHER copyright infringement. Yes, you read correctly – further.

We’ve all read enough articles on the perils of copyright infringement, but do we understand the rules completely when it comes to adding photos to our blogs?

Apparently, I thought I was adhering to the rules, but Thursday morning I woke up to an email sent to me from Creative Commons, telling me that I was being fined for unlawfully having used a photo which was posted on one of my blogs.

…to continue reading this post by D. G. Kaye, go to her post Listen Up! – #5 Tips to Protect Yourself from #Copyright #Infringement.

The Cost of Hiring a Traditional Publisher

Throught of the DayHave you ever had one of those Ah-ha! moments? Those times in your life when you believed one thing only to find out the opposite was true?

Everyone has them. Some probably have them more than others. I like to refer to these Ah-ha! moments as thinking outside the box. That’s been a catch-phrase of the past two decades, so now it doesn’t have the same power as it did before. It has lost its edge from overuse and misuse. Thinking outside the box to some might be ordering muffins for a meeting instead of the doughnuts that have been ordered for the past ten years.

That’s not really thinking outside the box. That’s just making a change.

One way of thinking outside the box to me means someone has taken a truth that is generally known in society and flipped it inside out to reveal the actual truth. It’s like viewing something from a different angle and learning it is “B” instead “A” like everyone else thought.

This sort of discovery is thought of as innovative thinking because it was never before realised.

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