Free eBook Download for Kindle

My short story collection Nova Scotia – Life Near Water is enrolled in Kindle Select, and from now until Sunday September 29th (12pm Pacific Time), it is FREE. The regular price is $2.99. Canadian residents can download it here, and those in the United States will find it here. Thank you for your downloads. Everyone counts. The paperback version will be available soon.

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The Man Who Reads Obituaries

Diane Lynn McGyver -The Man Who Reads ObituariesLast night I published a short story to Amazon.com. The Man Who Reads Obituaries is about 3,700 words long. It’s new and hasn’t been published anywhere up until now. This time around, I thought I’d try something different. I’d give Kindle Direct Publishing Select a try.

KDP Select is a program that locks a book into one distributor: Amazon.com. When you enrol, you can’t sell your book from any other site (Smashwords, B&N, Apple, etc.), including your own website. You can advertise the book on your website, but you can’t sell it directly to the customer.

Many people opt in to the program, hoping to get their book into as many hands as possible. The benefits are obvious:

 

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Canadians, Stop Paying 30% to the IRS

MONEY drainLINKS UPDATED: November 7, 2014

GREAT NEWS: The rules have changed. You no longer need an EIN or an ITIN unless you have extenuating circumstances. Read the update here: Update on Canada Tax Information with the United States. I will leave this original post up for those who still need to apply for an EIN.

* * * ORIGINAL POST * * *

Several months ago I discovered that Smashwords began withholding 30% of my earnings to give to America’s Uncle Sam. If I didn’t act, I’d continue to lose this money for the life of my writing career.

To claim this 30% in the future, I’d have to jump through hoops at 1,000 feet in the air and ride a wild boar through the desert…okay, nothing that drastic, but everything I read and everyone I talked to led me to believe that getting all the paperwork in order would be a time-consuming nightmare.

They couldn’t have been more wrong.

Let's Get Digital: How To Self-Publish, And Why You Should (Third Edition) (Let's Get Publishing Book 1) by [Gaughran, David]But before I realised the ease of reclaiming that money, I had reluctantly accepted the fact I would lose $300 for every $1,000 I’d earn in royalties. It was hard to swallow. Just think about this for a minute:

You post a book to Smashwords for $2.99. It sells through them to Kindle who takes 30% for selling it plus $0.09 for delivering it to the customer. You’re now left with $2.00. Smashwords takes about $0.14 of this for a service charge (their hand in selling it). You’re now left with $1.86. From this, Uncle Sam withholds 30%, leaving you with $1.30. Withhold means claiming that money as income tax.

Let me paint a bigger picture for you. For every 1,000 books you sell at $2.99, your profit drops from a potential $2999.00 to $1300.00 after all those hands grab what they want. If you didn’t have to pay Uncle Sam, you would have earned $1,860.00. It takes about 30 minutes to get an EIN and complete the proper form to reclaim that money. And you only have to do this once. In my books, $560 for a half hour’s work is an outstanding pay cheque.

The imagined nightmare has discouraged many writers from dealing with the IRS, but it doesn’t have to be like this. You can start claiming that 30% by following the simple steps below. It will take approximately 25 minutes of your time, one long-distant phone call, one completed form and a US stamp. Oh, and one envelope.

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Free Fantasy Novel by Yvonne Hertzberger

Do you love fantasy stories? Traditional, classic, epic fantasy novels?

Then you might be interested in the offerings of Yvonne Herzberger. For the next two days (including today), the two ebooks in her Earth’s Pendulum series—Back From Chaos and Through Kestrel’s Eyes—are free on Amazon.com.

Author Biography (snipped from Amazon, along with book covers)

Yvonne Hertzberger is a native of the Netherlands who immigrated to Canada in 1950. She is married with two grown children, (one married) and resides quietly in Stratford, Ontario with her spouse, Mark in a 130-year-old, tiny, brick cottage, where she plans to live out her retirement. She calls herself a jill-of-all-trades and a late bloomer. Her many past paid jobs included banking, day care, residential care for challenged children, hairdressing (her favourite) retail, and customer service. She enjoys gardening, singing, the theatre, decorating and socializing with friends and family.

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