Calculating the Price of Ebooks

The publishing world is changing quickly, making it difficult for authors and publishers to accurately judge the value of an electronic book. When ebooks first became available, there were no numbers to crunch to calculate their price. Should they go for free because they’re not permanent (in the same sense as a printed copy), or should they be priced the same as their paper counterparts?

Now with several years of ebooks behind us, a general pricing by publishers is taking shape. It’s aided by the facts more readers have devices to read ebooks and ebooks are becoming more popular. Have you looked at the price of the ebook version of the recent paperback you just bought? I did. The paper copy cost about $15.00 whereas the ebook cost $10.99.

Browsing Chapters online, I found many ebooks selling for more than ten dollars, some more than $30. Wow. I never thought electronic books would sell for so much, but then, this is a whole new world for books, authors and publishers. They—we—are learning as we go.

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Maud of the Red Mud

Occasionally, a blog I write for my Roots to the Past blog is related to writing. Today’s post is one of them. It gives a brief factual history on the life of Lucy Maud Montgomery, prolific writer and creator of Anne of Green Gables.

To read more about Maud of Prince Edward’s Island and to see pictures of her grave site and of Green Gables, read Maud of the Red Mud. If you’ve ever been to the island and dipped your feet in the mud, you know how staining memorable it is.

Book Launch: Nova Scotia Ghosts and Great Stories

Millie Macumber was a long time telephone operator in Maitland in the days when the operators, known as ‘central’ often worked alone. They knew practically everything that went on in the communities as listening in was almost a part of their job. This night a call came in for Gwen and Eugene Hirtle. When Millie answered and forwarded it on, there was no answer at the Hirtle home. The caller then said she would call again to which Millie replied that she didn’t need to bother; the Hirtles were away for the weekend and wouldn’t be home until Sunday night.

That’s just one of the stories you’ll find in Hattie Dyck’s book, Best Kept Secrets – From a Generation Past (2010, 231 pages). It includes home remedies, old traditions, community stories, news events, ghost stories and much more.

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Interview with Diane Lynn McGyver

Recently, I shared a cup of tea and cranberry muffins with author Diane Lynn McGyver. We discussed the coming year and her current projects. Below is the meat of that conversation.

TIBERT: I read your short story Mutated Blood Bonds on Smashwords. It intertwines the mysteries of the ending of the Mayan calendar and the grid lines criss-crossing Nova Scotia. What do you think will happen in December 2012?

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Sheila McDougall Has Completed Her First Novel

It’s easy to write a novel. Just ask anyone who hasn’t written one. They’ll tell you when they retire, they’ll write one and published it. They say this with such ease you’d think it was as simple as rising in the morning and dressing. After all, everyone who can put a few words on paper can write, so they’d be able to string together a few thousand words and write a novel. No problem.

And it isn’t a problem until they sit down to begin that first chapter.

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Thea Atkinson has a challenge for you.

Nova Scotia indie author Thea Atkinson has a challenge for blog readers. She wants to accumulate 100 followers by Christmas. With 68 already, it’s not an impossible number to reach for. She’s even offered an incentive: if the goal is reached, a random subscriber will receive one complete Thea ebook package. AND if she exceeds expectations and gains 200 followers of her blog by December 24th, a random subscriber wins the ebook package plus a $25 Amazon gift coupon.

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My Indie Publishing Experience: Lots and lots of homework

Once the decision to self-publish was made, I had to change my way of thinking. Instead of trying to get noticed by traditional publishers, I had to learn how to do what they did.

I began searching the Internet for stories about indie authors. Actually, in May 2010 I hadn’t yet heard the term indie author. That came several months later. Before then, I referred to those who published their books as self-publishers.

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My Indie Publishing Experience: The Road Already Taken

Over the past year, I’ve been asked by many people, both writers and non-writers, why I chose to self-publish my book Mystery Light in Cranberry Cove. My answers depended on which stage of publishing I had been in at the time. With the project completed and only marketing left, I can provide better, more thorough answers.

As promised in a post a short time ago, here is the first in a series of posts about my self-publishing journey.

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Local Indie Author: Art Burton

Diane Lynn Tibert
Psss! Did you hear about Art Burton in the Weekly Press?

I was looking through the Weekly Press yesterday and was pleasantly surprised to see a write-up on a local indie author. I dropped everything – including the column I had been working on – and sat to read the article.

I first met Art Burton of Latties Brook, Hants County, Nova Scotia at our local writers group about a year or so ago. At that time, we discussed self-publishing and the price of a finished soft cover novel. I had unwittingly said that $18 for a novel was way too much. After all, I can pick up my favourite fantasy novel for ten dollars or less. And I had purchased novels for my children for around the same amount. A novel only inches away from a lovely green twenty was out of my price range.

Later, I explored the local book store where I usually made my purchases. Certainly, the novels I had bought were around the ten dollar range, but some novels were in the high teens or slightly over twenty dollars. Obviously, I hadn’t done my homework before making that comment to Art. I have since corrected my views on the price of novels and told Art about my discovery.

Once again, “Sorry, Art.”

The article in the Weekly Press talks about Art’s current publication, For Hire, Messenger of God. But this isn’t his first published work. He’s well-known for his creative non-fiction Hoboes I Have Known.

To read the full article, visit the Weekly Press or if you’re local, pick up a copy of the newspaper. It’s on stands until Tuesday March 15th.

Art recently began a blog where he posts his experience as a self-published author. Drop by, have a look around and subscribe.