Book Review: Cammie Takes Flight by Laura Best

The full moon reaches its fingers through the tree branches and grabs at the furniture in my bedroom.

Cammie Takes Flight by Laura BestIn my opinion, this is the best line written by Laura Best in Cammie Takes Flight. There are many good lines in the book, but this one instantly created an image that made me pause.

We were introduced to young Cammie Deveau of Tanner, Nova Scotia, in Flying with a Broken Wing. She was living with her Aunt Millie then and at the end of that story, we learn her world was about to expand greatly.

The opening of Cammie Takes Flight puts us in the Halifax School for the Blind, where Cammie is adjusting to life in the big city, making new friends and trying to make sense of the actions of her father, Ed, and her Aunt Millie. Her ultimate goal turns out to be finding her mother, who had abandoned her at birth and who supposedly lives in Halifax.

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New Facebook Page for Atlantic Canada Writers to Promote Events

During my book launch in June, I spoke with author Tim Covell about writing groups we were members of on Facebook and how we couldn’t cross promote author events. This got the gears in my brain turning and by the time I arrived home that day, I had a plan: make a site where events could be shared.

Coming Soon

Because Tim and I are in two Facebook groups that are unable to share news and events, I thought it might be better if I involved the creator of the second site, Peter Foote, to see if we couldn’t collaborate on this effort to benefit members in both groups.

Long story short: It’s done!

If you are a writer living in one of the four Atlantic Canada provinces, you are welcome to join and promote your events. These events may include book launches, book signings and readings, market events where you plan to sell your book, virtual book launches, short-term sales (my eBook is free for the next two days; grab it now!), con events where you’ll be a vendor or something similar to these.

To learn more or to become a member, go to Atlantic Canadian Author Events and sign up.

Book Review: The Girl at the Top of the Tree by Barry Corbin

The Girl at the Top of the Tree

by Barry Corbin

Published: 2018

ISBN: 978-1775327905

Genre: Historical Fiction

Pages: 380

I enjoy local stories that take place in rural settings, so when I read The Girl at the Top of the Tree, it struct a nerve. The story takes place in rural Nova Scotia, the Annapolis Valley to be exact, or as locals call it, The Valley. It starts several generations into the past, but quickly transports readers to the 1960s.

The brief family history tugs at my genealogical nerve, and I’m wondering about the surname and if I can find it on a census record. Details about the First and Second World Wars also pique my interest. I’ve done a lot of research on both because of family members, including my father, who served in them.

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Impressions OR an Overview of CCMA

ImpressionsWe are often told you don’t get a second chance at making a first impression. Those first impressions brand themselves in our memories. We recall them every time your name is mentioned or your work passes our eyes. By the time you get to make a second impression, we may have recalled the first impression a dozen or more times, making it difficult to bump it aside for a different impression to take root.

Bad impressions imbed themselves deeper than good impressions—for the most part. This means if you made a bad impression the first time, you’ll have a mountain to climb to mend the fence.

Obviously, good impressions are important in our personal lives, but they are vital in our professional lives. They can make or break our business (which is gaining a reading audience), so it’s important to pay attention to your actions and words when in public, particularly if you’re in the company of readers and writers.

The flip side of that is we are always judging the impressions of others, both new and old acquaintances. We may not consciously do this, but we do it because it’s our nature. We use our morals and opinions to apply that judgement. So while something you did was great in the eyes of one person, it might not be so hot in the eyes of another.

It’s a tough road, but one we travel every day.

I was reminded of first and lasting impressions over the weekend when I attended several events associated with the Canadian Country Music Awards (CCMA) held in Halifax, NS. This was my first CCMA show, so my mind was wide open to what may or may not happen.

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When a Business Goes Out of Business

5x5BusinessI spoke with a relative who has been in business for himself for the past few decades. He’s seen companies come and go, and come back again. He’s seen companies that owed his company money go out of business, leaving him wondering how he would get paid for the services and products he provided.

As a person owed money by a company that goes out of business, sometimes we’re left in the dark, wondering the exact same thing: can I get the money owed to me, and if so, how do I get it?

My relative told me that getting paid isn’t automatic. Well, it is if you’re dealing with an honourable, honest company that values its reputation. When a reliable company goes out of business, all their debts are paid in full without hassle. They not only respect themselves and the laws, but their former service and product providers.

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A New Facebook Group for Writers of Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia WritersI started a group. Not just any group but one for writers who live in Nova Scotia. Writers born in the province and live elsewhere can also join. After all, once a Bluenoser, always a Bluenoser.

It’s a Facebook group. Here’s the low-down.

Goal: To bring together Nova Scotia writers to share information about their writing experience, to promote their work and that of others in the province.

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Welcome to Scarinish, Nova Scotia

Scarinish, Nova ScotiaThe setting for my first romance novel, Pockets of Wildflowers, is Nova Scotia, Canada. Why Nova Scotia? Because I’ve been from one tip to the other and around most of its shorelines. I’ve cut swaths across it from north to south shore and from north to eastern shore. I’ve bathed in its lakes, peed in its oceans, climbed its mountains and crossed its rivers. I’ve camped, skied, hiked, witnessed every season, endured extreme storms and survived its forests.

Writing a story about people in Nova Scotia feels like home. Everything is at my fingertips.

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Libby’s New to Blogland but Not to Writing

What would you do with dragon’s blood? Did Winnie the Pooh and Peter Pan play cricket together on the same team? Which teenaged queens lost their heads, literally? Are you interested in garden gnomes? How about Tudor history?

Have I piqued your interest?

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Book Launch: Nova Scotia Ghosts and Great Stories

Millie Macumber was a long time telephone operator in Maitland in the days when the operators, known as ‘central’ often worked alone. They knew practically everything that went on in the communities as listening in was almost a part of their job. This night a call came in for Gwen and Eugene Hirtle. When Millie answered and forwarded it on, there was no answer at the Hirtle home. The caller then said she would call again to which Millie replied that she didn’t need to bother; the Hirtles were away for the weekend and wouldn’t be home until Sunday night.

That’s just one of the stories you’ll find in Hattie Dyck’s book, Best Kept Secrets – From a Generation Past (2010, 231 pages). It includes home remedies, old traditions, community stories, news events, ghost stories and much more.

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We Grow Great Libraries in Canada

Last year I had read somewhere that in the United Kingdom, public libraries were taking a beating. With access to the Internet and ebooks, apparently the number of people using libraries was down. The government began to rethink the need for libraries and many were slated to close.

When I read this, I couldn’t believe my eyes. I had to search the webpage to see if this indeed was current news. It was. Not only were libraries being reduced in number, the government defended the closures by saying the public wasn’t interested in the old system any longer and preferred to learn and find information from the Internet. On top of that, fewer libraries meant tax payers would save millions.

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Borrow My Book at the Library

The other day a friend asked if my youth novel, Mystery Light in Cranberry Cove, could be borrowed from the library. It was then I remembered I didn’t promote the availability of my book through this public location.

So here’s the announcement.

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Interview with Diane Lynn McGyver

Recently, I shared a cup of tea and cranberry muffins with author Diane Lynn McGyver. We discussed the coming year and her current projects. Below is the meat of that conversation.

TIBERT: I read your short story Mutated Blood Bonds on Smashwords. It intertwines the mysteries of the ending of the Mayan calendar and the grid lines criss-crossing Nova Scotia. What do you think will happen in December 2012?

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“The end is near!” cawed the crow.

About twenty-five years ago Penhorn Mall in Dartmouth was a hopping place with many unique stores. I loved shopping there: park once, walk a spacious mall with no stairs or escalators, be protected from the weather and pick up everything from groceries and alcohol to boots and tires. Woolco was on one end, Sears on the other and Sobeys was stuck midway. For a mall, I found it very relaxing even on Christmas Eve. Sure it was busy, but the people who shopped there were the neighbourhood-kind of people.

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Which Language Do You Write?

I hadn’t realised it, but when I was skeptical, I was wrong.

Instead of skeptical, I really wanted to be sceptical. Yeah, that’s right. As a Canadian who strives for Canadian English, I should have used C instead of K. But as far as I remember, I had never spelt the word this way before. But then again, maybe I did while in school.

Sometimes the greatest influence on our English language in Nova Scotia is from the United States. It doesn’t help that some English teachers are ignorant to our Canadian spellings. We grow up hearing one spelling or another or both and by the time we’re my age we’re totally confused by the way certain words are spelt.

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Thea Atkinson has a challenge for you.

Nova Scotia indie author Thea Atkinson has a challenge for blog readers. She wants to accumulate 100 followers by Christmas. With 68 already, it’s not an impossible number to reach for. She’s even offered an incentive: if the goal is reached, a random subscriber will receive one complete Thea ebook package. AND if she exceeds expectations and gains 200 followers of her blog by December 24th, a random subscriber wins the ebook package plus a $25 Amazon gift coupon.

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