Book Launch: Revelation Stones at Dartmouth Book Exchange

Tomorrow, Saturday June 15th, between 1:00 pm and 4:00 pm, I launch Revelation Stones, the 3rd book in the Castle Keepers series at Dartmouth Book Exchange, 1187 Cole Harbour Road, Cole Harbour, Nova Scotia. I spent the first 29 years of my life in that community and return often to visit family. While I’ve not lived there since 1996, it still feels like home.

I’ll also have paperback copies of Shadows in the Stone (book 1) and Scattered Stones (book 2), as well as book 1 in the Mystical series, a series within a series, Beyond the Myst.

This is my first event in a book store, so I’m going in with no expectations; my goal is to have fun, meet readers and sell a few books.

I laughed out loud when I thought of the fun that could be had if that’s all that’s expected. It’s a good goal in life. I think I’m going to milk it.

If you’re in Cole Harbour tomorrow, pop in, have a chat. The Dartmouth Book Exchange has thousands of used books; you’ll find one you love.

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Constructing Paragraphs in Fiction

Last week, I discussed writing nonfiction paragraphs. Many of the rules that apply to this type of paragraph also apply to fiction paragraphs. Descriptive paragraphs within fiction can often be written in the same style as nonfiction paragraphs.

Usually, writing factual or descriptive paragraphs is not a problem for most writers. However, the same cannot be said for writing fiction paragraphs involving characters. Although the same rules apply, they are slightly different.

A Few Rules for Writing Fiction Paragraphs

  1. They should contain only one idea.
  2. Each time a different character speaks, acts or thinks, a new paragraph must be started.
  3. They should be no longer than 1/3 of the page and preferably shorter.

Regarding Rule #2, if a new paragraph is not started when a different character speaks, acts or thinks, readers will be confused and not know who is doing or saying what. Here’s an example of what could happen if this rule was not followed.

Wilma was one day away from retirement and walked with a spring in her step towards the bus stop. When she spotted her friend Rose, she waved. “How are you this morning,” said Rose. “Happy. Excited.” She hugged her friend. “I bet you can’t wait to leave on your around-the-world trip.” “I stayed up half the night packing.” She looked to see the bus approach. “We better hurry. I don’t want to be late for my last day at work.” Rose looped her arm with hers and tugged her forward. “It would be a bad omen for your retirement.”

Writing like this confuses readers, and it wouldn’t take long before they dropped the book and went onto something else, like cleaning out the chicken coop.

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