Readers, help us solve a few mysteries about your reading habits.

Recently, I confessed to not reading prologues. I’m not sure when I stopped reading them, but I believe it was in my late teens. Why? From what I can remember, I thought they were boring and unnecessary to the story. In my mind, they kept me from getting to the story, stalled my progress, and that was something I was unwilling to do, particular if I really wanted to read the book.

It’s been so long since I read a prologue, that I truly can’t remember if those books in the 70s and 80s had boring prologues. In some cases, they were merely information dumps, something the author couldn’t creatively inject into the story.

Or perhaps it was the books I was reading, not the period. Maybe the books were written in the 60s or 50s or before then. I can’t say.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Books with Table of Contents in the back of eBooks targeted by Amazon

New FlashAmazon is an extremely innovative company – and usually quite responsive to self-publisher’s concerns – but sometimes it gets things very wrong too.

Today is one of those times.

I’ve received several reports from writers threatened with having books removed from sale, and heard even more worrying stories from others who had their titles actually removed from the Kindle Store without notice.

What were these authors guilty of? What crime did they commit for Amazon to adopt such heavy handed treatment? Something completely innocuous: the Table of Contents was at the rear of their books instead of at the front.

Continue reading

Establishing Front and Back Matter

Publishing 101This is one in a series of posts entitled Publishing 101: Draft to Book in 30 Days. To learn more about this challenge, visit the Publishing 101 page, where all links regarding this topic will be listed as they become available.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – –

The front and back matter of a paperback and hardcover book is different from that found in eBooks. Sometimes it’s the same, just located in a different spot. For the purpose of this post, I’ll discuss the front and back matter for the paperback copy of Fowl Summer Nights.

If you are unsure about any of the items in a paper copy book or you’re wondering how to lay it out, just check out the books on your shelf or your local library’s shelf. Not all books display the information the same. I recommend finding books similar in subject to the one you are publishing and use them as examples.

You can check out other genres and types of books too, just in case you stumble upon a unique idea.

In general, most novels have the following items:

  • title page
  • copyright page
  • dedication
  • prologue
  • a short clip of an exciting scene
  • table of contents
  • biography
  • picture for biography

Title Page

The Title Page is the first page you’ll see when you open the book. It contains at least two items: the title of the book and the name(s) of the author(s). I also add three other lines in small font at the bottom of the page: my publishing company (Quarter Castle Publishing), location (Nova Scotia, Canada) and the month and year of publication (March 2014).

Continue reading